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Posts Tagged ‘spine’

EMI on the back (part2)

Another 3 problems to  go with the Pathology / diagnosis theme EMI in the previous post.

I’m hoping it will be possible  to get all this self-assessment material into the Test Yersel page soon but at the moment there’s not a quick way in.

Enjoy the EMIs, answers at the end of the week, (the photo of the spine model has nothing to do with the questions, Ed)

Theme : pathology

A S1 nerve root entrapment

B  spondylolisthesis

C  central  cord compression

D T1 root entrapment

E  C5/6 root entrapment

F  L3 root compression on the  left

G  infection in the L4/5 disc

H  spinal  tumour

I  cauda equina lesion

J  L3 root compression  on the right side

Match the clinical presentations below to the most appropriate pathology listed above:

4.   Back pain without radiation in a 60 year-old woman associated with pyrexia, high white cell count and a “hot spot”    on bone scan.

5.  Bilateral  leg pain with back pain and urinary retention.

6.  Loss of ankle jerk on examination.

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Here’s an example of a EMI question for spinal problems which goes with last week’s core clinical focus

Theme : pathology

A S1 nerve root entrapment

B  spondylolisthesis

C  central  cord compression

D T1 root entrapment

E  C5/6 root entrapment

F  L3 root compression on the  left

G  infection in the L4/5 disc

H  spinal  tumour

I  cauda equina lesion

J  L3 root compression  on the right side

Match the clinical presentations below to the most appropriate pathology listed above:

1  Neck pain and wasting of the interossei muscles in the hand

2  Depressed right knee jerk and weakness on knee extension

3  Pain shooting from the back down the side of the leg to the lateral  side of the foot

More later but that’s all for now (don’t let me forget to post the answers by Friday, Ed)

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AP Xray of lumbar spine

 This x-ray shows a fracture of a vertebra following a  high velocity road traffic accident. 

The lateral  view nearby shows the extent of the damage to the individual bone.

This is a good case to think about the management of major trauma in general and the risks, management and complications of this serious injury.

You can send in any answers to Dundeebones (who promises not to publish them if you are not sure they are right! ed)

Discussion on management at the end of week2 on DundeeBones.

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